Top 3 Questions You’re Embarrassed to Ask Your OB-GYN

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For first-time and veteran mothers alike, pregnancy can bring up a variety of questions that might feel a little awkward asking out loud. The good news is that most women have had those same questions at some point and that there are answers from trained professionals.

 

Here are some questions about pregnancy you may have wanted to ask but felt too nervous to do so:

 

How Likely Is a Bowel Movement During Delivery?

This fear comes up frequently with new mothers, to the point where they can become so fixated on not having a bowel movement that it inhibits their ability to push.

 

It’s actually extremely common to have a bowel movement during labor, and it’s nothing to be ashamed of. There’s a simple reason why it happens: the same muscles a woman uses to push a baby out of her uterus are the same ones she uses when having a bowel movement. With the added weight on her colon and rectum as the baby moves through the birth canal, it’s a very natural bodily reaction.

 

While it may seem embarrassing, keep in mind that childbirth is a very private affair. Doctors are not only undaunted by this, but generally expect it. They’re trained professionals and their primary concern is making sure the mother and baby are healthy throughout the entire pregnancy and delivery.

 

Will My Vagina Be Stretched After I Give Birth?

Not really. Believe it or not, vaginas have muscle memory. The vagina is also made to accommodate childbirth; in other words, it stretches during childbirth and then contracts to its normal size. If a woman wants to strengthen her pelvic floor muscles, there are Kegel exercises, though make sure to check with a doctor first before trying them.

 

Why Does Sex Hurt After Birth?

Having a baby is hard work! With childbirth comes natural trauma to the vaginal area, and it needs time to heal. It’s natural for the sex drive to decrease, given how exhausting caring for a newborn can be. On top of that, if mothers choose to breastfeed, that can change her hormone levels as well, particularly her estrogen levels. This can lead to problems with lubrication. One potential solution is to use a lubricant, as well as giving the body time to adjust postpartum.

 

If the pain continues to exist months after birth, however, it’s best to speak to a doctor to make sure there aren’t any lasting issues.

Top Medical Center Undergoes Traumatic Event

Dr. Nakita Levy, Gynecologist at Johns Hopkins, Committed Suicide after Investigation for Recording Patients.

Dr. Nikita Levy, Gynecologist at Johns Hopkins, Committed Suicide after Investigation for Recording Patients.

In a recent article by The Boston Globe, Johns Hopkins is said to have to pay a $190 million in a gynecology settlement. A gynecologist at one of the world’s top medical centers, Johns Hopkins Health System, was fired after 25 years for secretly used tiny cameras to record and take pictures of his patients. Because of this, Johns Hopkins has been forced to pay $190 million to 8,000 women and girls that have been affected by this doctor’s actions. Dr. Nikita Levy was spotted by a female co worker with his pen like camera that he used around his neck and alerted authorities. Roughly 1,200 videos and 140 images where stored on his computers at home. After being investigated by authorities, Dr. Levy committed suicide.

Many women and girls were “brutalized” by this recent finding. Many had issues sleeping, they were unable to work, and ended up needing counseling. In the preliminary settlement which was approved by a judge on Monday, this was said to be one of the largest cases on record in the United States. Even though this case has been closed and never produced criminal charges, it still threatens the reputation of Johns Hopkins.

Lawyers working on the case state that thousands of women were traumatized even though their faces were not visible in the pictures and videos that were recovered. According to attorney, Howard Janet, 62 of the victims were young girls whose chaperones were sent out of the exam rooms by Dr. Levy, breaking hospital protocol. It is the hope of Johns Hopkins that the pictures are never leaked and that the victims involved in this recent case will achieve some sense of closer soon. Looking forward for the future, Johns Hopkins hopes that people will not think of the institute in a negative light after this recent case since the institute does so much good for the community.

Controversy Over Necessity of Pelvic Exams

Pelvic exams may not be a necessary procedure during an annual gynecologist exam for women who are not pregnant.

Pelvic exams may not be a necessary procedure during an annual gynecologist exam for women who are not pregnant.

The yearly trip to the gynecologist can be a dreaded event for many females.  Pap smears are unpleasant and can often be only the tip of the iceberg, as many doctors also include pelvic and rectal exams as well.  However, according to an article completed by the Daily News that summarizes a new series of guidelines released by the American College of Physicians, the pelvic exams may no longer be a necessary procedure to inflict upon women who are not pregnant.

In the procedures involved in the yearly check up with a gynecologist, women are often subjected to pelvic exams under the pretense that the ordeal can help in finding possible signs of ovarian cysts, sexual transmitted infections, uterine fibroids and early detection of cancer.  However, according to findings published by the ACP in their journal Annals of Internal Medicine, the routine pelvic exam has not shown to benefit as it was previously thought to.  The exam is now believed to rarely detect important disease and doesn’t reduce mortality in the average risk woman who is not pregnant.  In fact, the examination is often associated with discomfort for many women, including a round of potential false positives and negative exams, along with additional unnecessary costs.  However, this finding does not apply to pap smears, which are believed to still be beneficial.

The researchers with the American College of Physicians are not the first to suggest that pelvic exams could be excluded from the routine trip to the OBGYN.  Carolyn Westhoff was the first to suggest eliminating the procedure, with an article published in 2011.  The article indicated that if the woman was experiencing none of the typical concerning symptoms—such as discharge, abnormal bleeding, pain, urinary problems or sexual dysfunction—the procedure was very unnecessary.  She, in turn, approves of the announcement made by the ACP.

However, Westhoff and the ACP are not without their opponents.  The guideline is expected to stir up quite a bit of controversy. The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology remains in favor of the annual pelvic exam, as it allows doctors to fully explain a patient’s anatomy to them—including a reassurance of normality and an ability to answer any questions.